Weaste Cemetery

April 02, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

I only live a couple of minutes walk from Weaste Cemetery, I find it a lovely place to visit occasionally - here is some information from the Salford City council website.

Weaste Cemetery was Salford's first municipal cemetery. Before the cemetery opened in 1857 most burials took place in churchyards. Salford Corporation was one of the first municipal authorities to recognise that churchyards could no longer provide sufficient burial space and so the plans for Weaste were made.

In the Victorian age, cemeteries were considered to be amenities like parks and gardens and were usually designed in a similar way. Weaste Cemetery was no exception and its beautiful design made it the most desirable resting-place for well to do Salfordians and Mancunians.

Since 1857 over 300,000 interments have taken place at the cemetery, including:

  • Joseph Brotherton - became MP for Salford in 1832. In 1849 he was instrumental in making Salford the first municipal authority in Britain to establish a library, a museum and an art gallery, and later with William Ewart persuaded Parliament to pass the Public Libraries Act. Joseph Brotherton's belief in clean living and a clean environment for working people made him a prime motivator in the establishment of Peel Park in Salford. He also helped set up the vegetarian movement and his wife is credited with writing the first vegetarian cookbook.
  • Sir Charles Hallé - Britain's longest-established professional symphony orchestra, the The Hallé, was founded in Manchester by the pianist and conductor Charles Hallé, and gave its first concert in the city's Free Trade Hall in 1858.
  • Mark Addy - a renowned local figure who worked in a factory near the river Irwell, and during his life saved around 53 people from drowning after leaping in to save them. There is a memorial in the cemetery dedicated to him, paid for by grateful local people.
  • Eddie Colman - one of the Busby Babes who tragically died in the Munich air disaster in 1958.
  • Ferdinand Stanley - was immortalised in Alfred Lord Tennyson's epic poem Charge of the Light Brigade, after surviving the battle in 1854.

The other day I was trying to get Dylan to go down for a nap so I had a quick drive through the cemetery to get shots of some of the elaborate memorials that would look good as mono conversions.

Here are some of my favourites.


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